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A View from Beacon Hill

My name is Skip Pile, living in Boston and generally watching closely from

a distance.

cityofbostonarchives:

Jamaica Plain High School student with shed and chickens , circa 1900-1920, Jamaica Plain High School Photographs Collection circa 1925-1940, (Collection # 0420.044) City of Boston Archives
   This work is free of known copyright restrictions.  Please attribute to City of Boston Archives. To see more images from this collection, click here

Kind of like my high school.

cityofbostonarchives:

Jamaica Plain High School student with shed and chickens , circa 1900-1920, Jamaica Plain High School Photographs Collection circa 1925-1940, (Collection # 0420.044) City of Boston Archives

Public Domain Mark
This work is free of known copyright restrictions.  Please attribute to City of Boston Archives. To see more images from this collection, click here

Kind of like my high school.

nybg:

Inspired by the likes of Tim Walker, the Dutch Masters, and Cecil Beaton, the arrangements and installations are in a lot of ways works of art. BRRCH has been featured in Vogue, Elle, and The New York Times Magazine and has done work for Byredo, Steven Alan, and Moda Operandi. Asch says her goal is to bring nature into the city, and I think she is doing just that. (via BRRCH Flowers - Best New York Florists - Brittany Asch - Style.com)

Fashion Week is wrapping up here in NYC, so it’s no surprise that the latest NYBG Floral Design alum to make the spotlight is so stylish. Brittany’s arrangements are gorgeous! Lush, delicate, elegant, and naturalistic—she’s certainly making the most of her NYBG training. ~LM

Fantastic work.

nybg:

skunkbear:

The blooming of an Amorphophallus titanum (AKA corpse flower AKA titan arum) at The Huntington Library last week inspired me!

If you think humans jump through a lot of hoops just to reproduce, check out this plant. It waits 7-10 years, storing up starch in a giant tuber, just so it can bloom for a single day. Then it pretends to be a hunk of rotting meat to attract insect pollinators. Then, months later, it switches tactics to a produce a sweet fruit so birds will disperse it’s seeds.

If you have never smelled a titan arum but for some odd reason you would like to … you are in … luck? Scientists have identified the exact malodorous chemicals that come off these strange flowers to attract pollinators - so you can create the scent at home!*

*please, for your own sake, don’t try this at home.

As good a breakdown of Amorphophallus titanum as you’re likely to find. And who wouldn’t enjoy a recipe for one of nature’s most impressive stinkbombs? —MN

Happening now.

nybg:

You’re right, that’s just a rendering up there. But the designer of this tree, artist Sam Van Aken, is hoping to see the real things produce a similar sherbet rainbow when his “Trees of 40 Fruit” mature. Consider this the Frankenstein (or Mr. Stitch, if you saw that one) of grafting experiments.
Not a genetic experiment so much as a patient grafting of 40 different stone fruit branches onto a single trunk, this tree is designed to not only produce fruits of all sorts throughout the year, but create a stunning palette in the process. And according to Van Aken, it’s also about preserving uncommon local stone fruit varieties, some of which he stuffs into each tree he creates.
So far there are 16 young trees planted around the country. We’ll see what comes of them. Head through for the full story. —MN
(Photo credit: The Verge, Tree of 40 Fruit)

Fascinated or repulsed?

nybg:

You’re right, that’s just a rendering up there. But the designer of this tree, artist Sam Van Aken, is hoping to see the real things produce a similar sherbet rainbow when his “Trees of 40 Fruit” mature. Consider this the Frankenstein (or Mr. Stitch, if you saw that one) of grafting experiments.

Not a genetic experiment so much as a patient grafting of 40 different stone fruit branches onto a single trunk, this tree is designed to not only produce fruits of all sorts throughout the year, but create a stunning palette in the process. And according to Van Aken, it’s also about preserving uncommon local stone fruit varieties, some of which he stuffs into each tree he creates.

So far there are 16 young trees planted around the country. We’ll see what comes of them. Head through for the full story. —MN

(Photo credit: The Verge, Tree of 40 Fruit)

Fascinated or repulsed?

sixpenceee:

inverted-typo:

This is actually a test showing how sponges pump water through themselves for filter feeding!
They simply colored the water around them so you could easily see the process.

(Source: sizvideos, via indefenseofplants)

xysciences:

The Hydromantes salamander has the fastest tongue in the world. 
It can also extend to 80% the body length of the salamander.
[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

xysciences:

The Hydromantes salamander has the fastest tongue in the world. 

It can also extend to 80% the body length of the salamander.

[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

(Source: xyprogramming, via indefenseofplants)

"Migaloo"—-famous white whale photographed off the coast of NSW Australia.

"Migaloo"—-famous white whale photographed off the coast of NSW Australia.

cityofbostonarchives:

Haymarket, 1969 January, Peter H. Dreyer slide collection, Collection #9800.007, City of Boston Archives.
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License.  Please attribute to City of Boston Archives and credit Peter Dreyer.. For more images from this collection, click here

cityofbostonarchives:

Haymarket, 1969 January, Peter H. Dreyer slide collection, Collection #9800.007, City of Boston Archives.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 United States License.  Please attribute to City of Boston Archives and credit Peter Dreyer.. For more images from this collection, click here

(via meganjohnson)